RF Safety Applications

Important Points

What Our Customers Say

“Thank you for a great class this morning; we had great feedback from all our crews that attended. They all feel that it will benefit them very much. Keep up the good work.” —Rob Machetta, General Manager Construction, One Way Building Services
“Richard Strickland, who conducts the SBE RF Safety seminars, is a professional person who does not use scare tactics in his presentations. He is eminently qualified, and we are looking forward to working with him to provide a means for SBE members (and, in fact, anyone who is professionally required to enter controlled RF environments) to easily, cheaply, and confidently comply with the [requirements] for RF safety training.” —Chris Imlay, Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE) General Council, June 2007 SBE Signal magazine. (RF Safety Solutions has conducted more than a dozen classes for SBE with over 900 students in more than 60 cities in the United States and as far away as Johannesburg, South Africa, since this article was written.)
 “I have spoken with several here in my office, and they found it very helpful and gained knowledge that they did not have and cleared up several misconceptions.” —Mike Strand, Project Manager, Technology Associates
It was a small but worthwhile event in Raleigh! Even our 30-year-veteran Curtis Media engineer learned a lot and so did the student engineer…! We agreed that the most relevant topics covered for us were remembering to account for the OTHER guys' on-site antennas at our locations and also improper safety sign placement, of which we all admitted guilt! Thank you for the effective use of our time!” — Rob Truitt III, Staff Engineer, Curtis Media Group

RF Safety Training Courses

All of our classes make extensive use of pictures and simple diagrams that make it easy to understand the concepts being taught. Every student receives a PDF file of the slides used in the course. The FCC Regulations require that a person must receive both verbal and written instruction in order to be considered fully aware, an important criteria in determining which set of Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) limits apply.

How You Will Learn

All of our classes make extensive use of pictures and simple diagrams that make it easy to understand the concepts being taught. Every student receives a PDF file of the slides used in the course. The FCC Regulations require that a person must receive both verbal and written instruction in order to be considered fully aware, an important criteria in determining which set of Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) limits apply.

Click on any thumbnail to open the slide show.

  • Training1
    Towers that have only directional sector antennas are quite safe to climb as long as the climber understands the radiation patterns of the antennas.
  • Training2
    Rooftops like this—with only sector antennas around the perimeter or well above your head—have very low RF field levels.
  • Training3
    These very accurate computer models show the magnitudes of RF energy radiating from a vertical whip antenna compared to a sector antenna.
  • Training4
    Personnel who climb towers, especially if they are free-climbing because there is no ladder, should plan their climb with the location of antennas in mind.
  • Training5
    These very accurate computer models depict the spatially averaged exposure that a person would experience near a sector antenna if he or she were directly in front of it as well as if it was elevated either 6 or 10 feet.
  • Training6
    This slide is used to explain the areas where a person might be exposed to RF field levels that exceed either the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) limit for either General Population/Uncontrolled exposure or Occupational/Controlled exposure.
  • Training7
    In many ways, the potential for harm from an AM detuning circuit is worse than many potential RF overexposure situations.
 

 

Although all of our classes customized to some degree to best fit a particular audience, many classes are based on one of these course descriptions.

 

This three-hour course is by far our most popular. Students learn everything they need to know to work around wireless systems and broadcast antennas, whether they are on towers, rooftops, or other installations, such as water tanks. The course covers biological effects, standards, and safe work practices. It emphasizes safe work distances from common antenna systems such as cellular, two-way radio, and FM radio and television broadcast and the proper use of time averaging. It also covers the shock and burn problems faced by those working near AM detuning networks on wireless towers and at AM radio sites, where there is a growing trend of installing wireless antennas. The course also covers the proper use and limitations of RF personal monitors and RF protective garments.

The goal is to provide students with a solid foundation in the principles of RF safety as well as the practical information about safe work practices and the characteristics of common antennas that one is likely to work near. Personnel who complete this course should feel confident to work in areas with significant RF field levels. They will be considered fully aware and able to exercise control in accordance with the FCC Regulations.

Course Number

WIR201

Course Name RF Safety for Wireless Proffessionals & Tower Climbers
Course Length 3.0 hours
Prerequisite None
Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ Yes
Semi-Custom On-Site Course Yes

This two-hour class is a shorter version of our very popular three-hour WIR201. It covers much of the same material. The major differences are that there is less emphasis on explaining the biological effects and the regulations. The workplace safety coverage is very similar. Personnel who climb towers, especially those who have any chance of getting near FM radio or television antennas, are advised to take WIR201. BAS102 is ideal for those workers who occasionally come in close proximity to antennas or work primarily on the ground at typical wireless sites.

Course Number

BAS102

Course Name RF Safety Basics for the Communications Industry
Course Length 2.0 hours
Prerequisite None
Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ Yes
Semi-Custom On-Site Course Yes

This course is the ideal introduction to the RF safety for those that might occasionally have to deal with it. The course covers antennas and industrial equipment sources to help student identify what places might be areas with the potential for RF exposure. This short course covers the basics of RF biology and explains the differences between the two forms of radiation—ionizing and nonionizing—which is often the cause of misunderstanding about RF energy. Students often include environmental health and safety professionals who want a simple yet practical overview of the subject of RF safety.

Course Number

BAS101

Course Name Introduction to RF Safety
Course Length 1.0 hours
Prerequisite None
Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ Yes
Semi-Custom On-Site Course No

More than 900 broadcast professionals have taken this three-hour course. Because all the students normally have an electronics background, the course is faster paced than most other courses, which allows even more content to be covered in the same amount of time. Students will learn everything they need to work around broadcast antennas, wireless systems antennas, and satellite-uplink systems on towers and rooftops. Wireless systems antennas are covered because many broadcasters have repeater systems located on rooftops to get news from ENG trucks back to the studio. The course covers biological effects, standards, and safe work practices, as well as safe work distances from common antenna systems, such as cellular, two-way radio, and FM radio and television broadcast. Students will learn about the shock and burn problems faced by those working at AM radio stations and the unique induced current problems faced by those who climb AM towers. The proper use and limitations of RF personal monitors and RF protective garments will be discussed.

The goal is to provide students with a solid foundation in the principles of RF safety as well as practical information about safe work practices and the characteristics of common antennas that one is likely to work near. Personnel who complete this course should feel confident to work in areas with significant RF field levels. They will be considered fully aware and able to exercise control in accordance with the FCC Regulations.

This course is available for groups as a Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ course.  Individuals and small groups should contact the Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE). SBE offers this course an average an average of once a year.

Course Number

BRD202

Course Name RF Safety for Broadcast Proffessionals
Course Length 3.0 hours
Prerequisite Knowledge of electronics
Public RF Safety LiveCast™ Available through SBE
Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ Yes
Semi-Custom On-Site Course Yes

This advanced class is tailored to fit the students and their work environment. Typically, this class is composed of three distinct parts:

  1. An RF safety course that is taught the morning of the first day. This course is typically very similar to either WIR201 or BRD202.

  2. An afternoon classroom session that covers survey equipment, including design, applications, and limitations; measurement techniques, including spatial averaging; measurement artifacts (anomalies that yield strange measurement results); and proper documentation of an RF survey.

  3. Fieldwork. This is typically a half day, but it can take longer, depending on the time needed to travel to an antenna site or sites, and the number of students to be trained.

There is no limit to the number of students that can attend the first two parts of the course but the fieldwork portion of the course can only accommodate a modest number of students unless additional time is allocated for training. It is important that every student use the instruments to make the measurements. Contact us to discuss your requirements.

Course Number

ADV301

Course Name RF Safety Measurements of Antenna Systems
Course Length 1.5 to 2.0 days
Prerequisite Knowledge of electronics
Semi-Custom RF Safety LiveCast™ Possible
Semi-Custom On-Site Course Yes

The cover story in the February 2012 issue of Radio World Engineering Extra titled "RF Safety Surveys At Broadcast Sites: A Basic Guide" is an example of some of the information taught in an advanced measurements course.

 

Schedule

RF Safety LiveCast™ courses and on-site training can be taught at any time or day that is mutually agreeable to the customer and RF Safety Solutions. Courses are most often taught in the morning at the training location during the week. But evening courses and weekend courses are also an option.

Feel free to call to discuss your requirements at any time. We can set up a short demonstration of about five minutes so that you can see some of the training materials.

Availability

RF Safety LiveCast classes are available to students worldwide. Because the audio portion of the course is conducted via a high-quality telephone bridge rather over the Internet, students outside the United States and Canada will incur the additional cost of a long-distance call.